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16S rRNA RefSeq: V15.22    Genomic RefSeq: V9.15
Genus: Schaalia
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No Notes
No Notes
percent abundance
SubPSupPKGBMHPSVTHPTTDST
Avg0.3600.1780.1830.6752.9312.0485.0824.0787.6510.005
10thp0.0000.0000.0000.0170.4510.4530.7210.3701.3110.000
90thp0.6740.5310.5861.6355.9944.74910.8549.28416.7200.014
Stdev0.8970.3160.3871.0612.7552.1694.5003.7906.2230.016
Prev77.92274.02662.33893.50698.70196.104100.00098.701100.00014.286
No Notes
percent abundance
SubPSupPKGBMHPSVTHPTTDST
Avg0.2330.1080.1290.5172.1361.3462.7552.3134.0740.002
10thp0.0000.0000.0000.0000.4810.2660.5120.2640.6620.000
90thp0.4220.2750.4221.4534.9913.2135.9195.18910.2540.000
Stdev0.8730.2170.3570.7001.8251.5042.4132.4673.6850.009
Prev70.94669.59539.86589.18999.324100.00097.97397.97399.3245.594
From: Dewhirst 35x9 data (not published yet)
No Notes
percent abundance
SubPSupPKGBMHPSVTHPTTDNS
Avg0.2380.2522.0510.3331.0282.1121.9542.0442.9260.003
10thp0.0200.0290.0020.0250.1990.3600.3740.2880.0270.000
90thp0.3890.6129.4970.6952.5265.2673.5474.0345.8500.007
Stdev0.5620.2334.7610.4020.8951.8641.5991.8632.5600.010
Prev100.00097.05988.889100.000100.00097.222100.000100.000100.00015.000
Overview: Bacteria of the genus Schaalia are abundant in the healthy mouth, particularly on the tongue dorsum, tonsils, and throat where they make up 3 to 6% of the oral microbial community. They were formerly considered to be in genus Actinomyces and were reclassified into genus Schaalia in 2018 (Nouioui et al. 2018).

Ecological role/importance in health and disease: There are 9 species of Schaalia in the mouth, including 5 named species (S. cardiffensis, S. georgiae, S. lingnae [Not Validly Published], S. meyeri, and S. odontolytica, as well as 4 taxa that are currently unnamed (Schaalia spp. HMT 172, 178, 180, and 877). Most of the Schaalia spp. detected in the healthy mouth in Human Microbiome Project data are members of the unnamed taxa S. sp. HMT 172 and S. sp. HMT 180 (Eren et al. 2014). S. odontolytica (formerly A. odontolyticus) is a member of the "purple complex" in subgingival plaque together with Veillonella parvula (Socransky et al. 1998).