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16S rRNA RefSeq: V15.22    Genomic RefSeq: V9.15
Genus: Streptococcus
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No Notes
percent abundance
SubPSupPKGBMHPSVTHPTTDST
Avg11.51214.39247.98952.15241.82512.74425.22123.87319.5870.065
Stdev9.0949.23220.60716.39216.6627.71117.05717.46613.3180.374
No Notes
percent abundance
SubPSupPKGBMHPSVTHPTTDST
Avg15.85518.50860.18660.54052.25417.65629.84331.35325.7040.071
10thp5.3168.03831.23137.43932.6584.2349.7258.89910.1710.000
90thp30.19733.76184.05282.77076.28431.68853.69159.62846.1480.193
Stdev11.80010.03220.51216.94716.79110.89217.92920.60713.4380.103
Prev100.000100.000100.000100.000100.00098.701100.000100.000100.00063.636
No Notes
percent abundance
SubPSupPKGBMHPSVTHPTTDST
Avg11.34315.13347.34553.56242.63313.83627.26924.42421.2670.032
10thp2.2785.08522.59230.04021.8565.7517.2137.0226.7290.000
90thp25.94928.60873.34476.14569.63723.50952.13748.02340.4010.109
Stdev8.89810.21219.78117.08417.3237.78517.66016.42113.6520.060
Prev100.000100.000100.000100.000100.000100.000100.000100.000100.00044.755
From: Dewhirst 35x9 data (not published yet)
No Notes
percent abundance
SubPSupPKGBMHPSVTHPTTDNS
Avg20.64231.03857.87557.87749.65043.51739.96738.17142.1440.676
10thp2.93815.97826.82733.08029.10018.03619.97411.64420.1870.000
90thp47.24849.41289.70882.86376.14774.37963.30462.16475.1291.538
Stdev16.12714.34423.75318.51919.11422.52616.26019.96722.2021.840
Prev100.000100.000100.000100.000100.000100.000100.000100.000100.00080.000
Overview: Streptococci are among the most abundant bacteria in the mouth, making up 30-60% of the bacteria on the buccal mucosa and 15-30% of the bacteria on the tongue dorsum and in supragingival plaque.

Ecological role/importance in health and disease: The 37 species of Streptococcus listed in HOMD include many members of the healthy commensal microbiota as well as several that are pathogens and one that is used to produce yogurt (S. thermophilus). Streptococci such as S. mitis and S. gordonii are among the first bacteria to colonize the tooth surface after it is cleaned, where they begin the process of ecological succession (Diaz et al. 2006). S. salivarius is abundant on the tongue dorsum and can carry out nitrate reduction to nitrite, thereby participating in the physiology of its human host (Hezel and Weitzberg 2013). Other streptococci that are usually rare in the healthy mouth can cause disease, such as S. mutans, which is associated with dental caries, S. pyogenes, which causes strep throat, and S. pneumoniae, which can cause pneumonia. In the subgingival plaque biofilm, most streptococci are grouped into the "yellow complex", but S. constellatus is a member of the "orange complex" marking part of the ecological succession from health toward periodontitis (Socransky et al. 1998).